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of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
in learning technology including new computers. as you can see from the 00 photo that i have brought to the floor, these are very impressive spaces and go a long way to paycheck -- to make it a friendly place. one of the goals of the library project is to help each transformed library become a hub for greater school community. because the weinberg foundation wants this to be a successful model, it has partnered with the baltimore education resource consortium to evaluate the impacting within the school community. evaluations are under way at the first three libraries and involve students, teachers, and community members. in addition to supplying books as part of each rein say, the foundation and its partners wanted to do even more to equip these new spaces with the adventure of reading. the library project in the first year launched a huge book drive with more than 40 partners and 100 pickup locations. it is clear that my fellow marylanders were eager to contribute directly to this project donating some 13,000 books valued at over $75,000. i share the story with my colleagues and the
announcer ] technology that makes you feel superhuman... where do i sign in? that's powerful. switch to fios and we'll triple your speeds for free with an upgrade to fios quantum. marvel's iron man 3, in theaters may 3rd. >>> good morning, america. this morning, terror at the boston marathon. the two explosions that rocked the finish line, three dead now. at least 140 injured. >> something just blew up. >> shock waves and shrapnel blasting the crowd. >> we're going to need more ambulances here. we need some more ambulances. >> this morning what we know about the victims right now including the children, an 8-year-old and 11-year-old caught in the horror and the harrowing story of the college women's lacrosse team just feet from the finish line. overnight playing out orndz boston. are the clues to the culprit buried in the bomb. we're live on the scene with breaking new details. brand-new video. >> announcer: this is a special edition of "good morning america": terror at the boston marathon" live from times square and boston. >> and good morning, america. from boston. you see those images o
to do, but ideally that money would go more towards technology and manpower. >> you would like flexibility? >> we would like flexibility. >> and the boston public health commission says the number of people injured in last week's blast is up to 264, those people have been treated in 26 area hospitals. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ very, very excited about that and very proud of that. >>beltway politics from inside the loop. >>we tackle the big issues here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe. >>dc columnist and four time emmy winner bill press opens current's morning news block. >>we'll do our best to carry the flag from 6 to 9 every morning. this show is about analyzing criticizing, and holding policy to the fire. are you encouraged by what you heard the president say the other night? is this personal or is it political? a lot of my work happens by doing the things that i am given to doing anyway. staying in tough with everything that is going on politically and putting my own nuance on it. not only does senator rubio just care
reunite lost friends and family members. still despite all the technology involved, perhaps the greatest power of social media monday was the ability to remind everyone of what really matters. two of boston's most famous natives. ben affleck and mark wahlberg posted. such a senseless and tragic day. my family and i send our love to our beloved and resill boston" and mark "thoughts and prayers with my hometown boston." >> who would have thought and the power of social media brought us together and kept us connected. >> thank you, bianna. we appreciate it. >>> coming up more from boston. we will talk to the eyewitnesses just ten feet from the explosion right at the finish line. >>> and we are back here in boston, i am here with david able, "the boston globe." thank you for joining us. you were right on the finish line at the moment the first blast went off. tell us about what you saw in that's correct. so i was there taking video as runners were coming in when i felt the ground shake and i heard a massive boom and i saw a large plume of smoke. took me a while to figure out exactly what was
of research that is necessary to develop new means and possibly new technology, new tools that are institutions of higher learning but institutions of learning across the board, beginning with our elementary schools need to do better. and i am proud to be a cosponsor of this legislation. i look forward to working with my colleagues to assuring that it will be passed. and senator kaine, who spoke so evocatively and eloquently on this floor today and who showed such grace under pressure, which is one of the definitions of courage, in responding to the virginia tech tragedy, he has worked to deal with the wounds, and he has resolved to learn from virginia tech. and indeed he worked as a governor to seek safer campuses across virginia and across the country. he fought to put in place commonsense laws that were -- would prevent shooters like cho seung-hui from having access to the arsenal that he used six years ago. and i want to thank senator kaine for helping to lead the effort for a ban on high-capacity ammunition magazines like the ones used at virginia tech and used at new
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7